Do cockroaches hibernate?

Answers:
no
who cares
No, they don't live that long anyway.
The ones in my kitchen do.
no
gosh, I hope not!
Yes for I am the level three buddah neighbor to the lord of cockroaches king of Sian.
They scavenge anything they can get and hide where us humans can't find them and make many babies and come out in full force.
I think they only know how to multiply
http://www.bio.umass.edu/biology/kunkel/.
The wild cockroaches in the northern USA do hibernate. They go into a suspended state of development in late fall and then they must go through a dormancy phase in the winter before they will resume development in the spring. If you keep them in a warm environment during the winter they will not develop any further and remain in a suspended state for more than a year. This phenomenon has not been published on as far as I know. The species I know this about through my unpublished research are Parcoblatta pensylvanicus and Parcoblatta virginica. It would be interesting to know if these species go through this hibernation in the southern reaches of their range where a hard winter is not experienced.
Only computers hibernate
The wild cockroaches in the northern USA do hibernate. They go into a suspended state of development in late fall and then they must go through a dormancy phase in the winter before they will resume development in the spring. If you keep them in a warm environment during the winter they will not develop any further and remain in a suspended state for more than a year. This phenomenon has not been published on as far as I know. The species I know this about through my unpublished research are Parcoblatta pensylvanicus and Parcoblatta virginica. It would be interesting to know if these species go through this hibernation in the southern reaches of their range where a hard winter is not experienced.
Nope. And they can live for about a week without their heads-after that, they die of thirst. Cockroaches are basically undeatable without Raid.
The wild cockroaches in the northern USA do hibernate. They go into a suspended state of development in late fall and then they must go through a dormancy phase in the winter before they will resume development in the spring. If you keep them in a warm environment during the winter they will not develop any further and remain in a suspended state for more than a year. This phenomenon has not been published on as far as I know. The species I know this about through my unpublished research are Parcoblatta pensylvanicus and Parcoblatta virginica. It would be interesting to know if these species go through this hibernation in the southern reaches of their range where a hard winter is not experienced.

http://www.bio.umass.edu/biology/kunkel/.

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